Tutorials and support

To create a tutorial you must first add a new tutorial. To do this go with the mouse in the upper right corner, and click Create Tutorial.

After clicking on New Tutorial a new page will open. On this page you will write the title of your tutorial. After completing this data click Create Tutorial ,Share what you know !

Tutorial class

In British academic parlance, a tutorial is a small class of one, or only a few students, in which the tutor, a lecturer, or other academic staff member, gives individual attention to the students.[citation needed]

The tutorial system at Oxford and Cambridge is fundamental to methods of teaching at those universities, but it is by no means particular to them; Heythrop College (University of London), for instance, also offers a tutorial system with one-on-one teaching. It is rare for newer universities in the UK to have the resources to offer individual tuition; a class of six to eight (or even more) students is a far more common tutorial size. At Cambridge, a tutorial is known as a supervision.

In Australian, New Zealand, and South African universities, a tutorial (colloquially called a tute or tut) is a class of 10–30 students. Such tutorials are very similar to the Canadian system, although, tutorials are usually led by honours or postgraduate students, known as 'tutors'.

At the two campuses of St. John's College, U.S. and a few other American colleges with a similar version of the Great Books program, a "tutorial" is a class of 12–16 students who meet regularly with the guidance of a tutor. The tutorial focuses on a certain subject area (e.g., mathematics tutorial, language tutorial) and generally proceeds with careful reading of selected primary texts and working through associated exercises (e.g., demonstrating a Euclid proof or translating ancient Greek poetry). Since formal lectures do not play a large part in the St. John's College curriculum, the tutorial is the primary method by which certain subjects are studied. However, at St. John's the tutorial is considered ancillary to the seminar, in which a slightly larger group of students meets with two tutors for broader discussion of the particular texts on the seminar list.

Some US colleges, such as, Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts, offer tutorials almost identical in structure to that of an Oxbridge tutorial. At Williams, students in tutorials typically work in pairs alongside a professor and meet weekly, while alternately presenting position papers or critiques of their partner's paper. by https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tutorial